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Monthly Archives: March 2019

Dru Riess Q&A

YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED A GREAT DEAL OF SUCCESS IN YOUR LIFE.  WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT, AND WHY? It depends what you define as success. I have built a business. I have made a lot of money. I have racked up a ton of accolades, but is that overall success or moments toward overall success. Through outsiders eyes I am a success, but I don’t feel that way. People like to put labels on things and I guess by social ruling I have a successful life. From my perspective I am in the middle of the war and have not won anything yet. For me at 35 years old I have to look at the glass half empty rather than half full. I have to stay aggressive and hungry. At 35 I may be leading the race by miles when compared to my peers, but the second I turn around to look over my shoulder and get content with my lead is when others will surpass what I am doing. I’m a competitor and unfortunately I don’t

Howard Bloom Q&A

YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED A GREAT DEAL OF SUCCESS IN YOUR LIFE. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT, AND WHY? Mastering a writing style that makes even the most complex issues clear, conversational, and hopefully delicious.  And piecing together a little project called The Grand Unified Theory of Everything In the Universe Including Sex, Violence and the Human Soul.  That’s the theory about which Pavel Kurakin of the Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Science in Moscow says, “Bloom has created a new Scientific Paradigm.  He explains in vast and compelling terms why we should forget all we know in complicated modern math and should start from the very beginning. … Even if we put aside all of the implications of Bloom’s approach for physics, all of the implications of Bloom’s approach for society, and look only at the implications for biology, Bloom has created a new approach to Darwinism. … Bloom’s Grand Unified Theory… opens a window into entire SYSTEMS we don’t yet know and/or SEE, new, untrivial collectives that DO EXIST and evolve

Noah Charney Q&A

YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED A GREAT DEAL OF SUCCESS IN YOUR LIFE.  WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT, AND WHY? In the professional sphere, I think it is having essentially founded a new field of study: art crime. I should say that I’m not the first one to have studied the field at all, of course, but the work I did as a doctoral student, in terms of the publicity through a significant New York Times Magazine article on it and me back in 2007, and the subsequent work of ARCA, the Association for Research into Crimes against Art, the research group I founded, helped to establish art crime as a field of study that attracted others, unified scattered specialists and helped inform the media, which was a real tangible result. My books are all related to art or art crime and it’s become my claim to fame, so I suppose I’d pick that. LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, LIFE IS NOT ALWAYS SMOOTH.  CAN YOU TALK ABOUT A SETBACK OR TRAGEDY YOU’VE ENCOUNTERED, HOW YOU DEALT WITH IT, AND THE

Steven Sashen Q&A

YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED A GREAT DEAL OF SUCCESS IN YOUR LIFE. WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT, AND WHY? Working with my wife, Lena Phoenix. When Lena and I became a couple, I was retired (so, WE were retired). We never talked about starting Xero Shoes, it just happened. And we’re a really good team. I’m the marketing/product/visionary. She’s the one who keeps the wheels on – HR, CFO, Operations. Watching her become an AMAZING business person has been literally awesome. Running the business together has made us closer than I imagine anything else could have LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, LIFE IS NOT ALWAYS SMOOTH. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT A SETBACK OR TRAGEDY YOU’VE ENCOUNTERED, HOW YOU DEALT WITH IT, AND THE IMPACT IT HAS HAD ON YOU? This is tricky. I don’t frame “negative” events as setbacks. And their impact changes over time. I literally can’t think of anything at the moment that I think of as a setback. Here’s a weird example: I was in China during the Tiananmen Square riots, and was shot at, captured, and held

Ed Asner Q&A

YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY EXPERIENCED A GREAT DEAL OF SUCCESS IN YOUR LIFE.  WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT, AND WHY? I would say my humanitarian efforts and my family. LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, LIFE IS NOT ALWAYS SMOOTH.  CAN YOU TALK ABOUT A SETBACK OR TRAGEDY YOU’VE ENCOUNTERED, HOW YOU DEALT WITH IT, AND THE IMPACT IT HAS HAD ON YOU? My divorce.  I was the responsible party and I still haven’t recovered. DO YOU SET ASIDE “ME-TIME” IN YOUR CALENDAR, AND WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME TO RELAX? Gloat over completing my duties. WHAT’S THE MOST MAGICAL PLACE YOU’VE DISCOVERED WHERE YOU CAN GO TO CHILL OUT? My bedroom DOES PHILANTHROPY PLAY A ROLE IN YOUR LIFE, TO WHAT EXTENT AND HOW? I love receiving gifts WHO IS ON THE GUEST LIST FOR YOUR IDEAL DINNER PARTY, PRESENT OR PAST? Socrates, Plato, Moses, Stalin, Hitler CAN YOU OFFER ANY WORDS OF WISDOM FOR OUR READERS? A penny saved is a penny earned

Mickey Redwine: Lone Star Patriot

We’ve written dozens of Throomers’ features by now. Incredible, energetic, accomplished people, one and all. This is no different. We’re excited to introduce an uncommon man whose interests, achievements and contributions are so copious and diverse, we needed to discover a central theme to tie them all together. We think we found it. The Lone Star State is where Mickey Redwine was born and bred. If there’s an essential element to the man, it is this. His place of birth has influenced much of his independent streak, his impassioned drive, and his outsized dignity. He is an American patriot and an unremitting entrepreneur, no doubt, but at his core the man is a true and proud Texan. Reminiscent of a long-ago frontiersman on the open plain, Redwine sees in the distance only the bright light of possibility drawing him onward to an even better day. His adventuresome spirit won’t allow for setting up camp any longer than is necessary. He grabs his side arm, a vitamin drink to recharge the batteries, and then saddles up his Harley to get a

Jim Rooney: Seasonal Wine Ideas

I’ll begin with a confession. I am neither a sommelier, nor have I ever been employed in the wine business. What possibly then could lend me enough credibility to informally offer wine suggestions to my fellow throomers (besides personally knowing the Throomers owners)? It’s a reasonable question worthy of a response, as soon as I think of one. Okay, let’s try this as rationale. In his mega best-selling non-fiction book, Outliers, author Malcolm Gladwell put forward his premise of what makes anyone an expert in their field. He posited that it takes 10,000 hours of dedicated practice in any endeavor to become a true expert. I was certainly no prodigy, especially since it’s illegal to be a prodigy in drinking wine, but, ‘Three hours a day for ten years?’ Ha! – are you kidding me? I passed 10,000 hours of wine consumption many labels ago, and I don’t recall it even being a challenge. The bigger issue was convincing me at the end of many evenings that it was time to shut down my “dedicated practice” session. I was simply that

Aging is Cool: Sleepaway Camp

One couple is changing the face of aging in our world by showing everyone how cool it can be! What if we viewed aging as a new adventure instead of yielding to society’s accepted norm of inevitable decline in physical and mental health, losing independence, and dying alone? Why have we viewed our “golden years” as a time of loss and decay rather than a time of growth?  What if aging is actually cool? These are the questions that Amy and Damien Temperley began asking a few years ago as they created Aging is Cool, a company with a nonprofit arm based in Austin, Texas, that provides programs and services to help older adults Stay Strong, Stay Smart, and Stay Social. Looking Beyond the Status Quo For over 25 years, Amy had worked in the nonprofit sector predominantly with frail older adults who needed daily care or were dealing with a dementia diagnosis. London-born Damien was seeing a more active side of aging as a fitness instructor for a local senior center.  Together, they were both seeing gaps in service

Amanda Hayhurst: Selfless Angel

Caya and Courtney Knight posted the flyer time and again across the greater Atlanta area. For five long years, their 50-year-old single mom, Vonchelle, had been hooking up nightly to a dialysis machine to replicate the critical blood cleansing and balancing work of her failed kidneys. She feared her time was running out. The grim statistics say that once a person starts on dialysis they have an average of seven years of life remaining. Unless they are blessed to find a kidney donor. The disappointment of spending eight years on the donor wait list was wearing on Knight and her family. But she never lost her hope or optimism. Besides her family, her saving grace was her career as an analyst at Northside Hospital’s Bone Marrow Transplant Department, where she participated on a team that regularly saved the lives of others, including many children. A mission of love can certainly keep one’s spirits high. When at home, she would raise her daughter’s spirits by repeating her affirmation, “This is my year, Lord, this is my time for a miracle. I

Chad Pregracke: Rescuing Our Rivers

One of the most powerful forces of nature, the river, has been revered the world over since ancient times, says ‘HelpSaveNature.com.’ These massive freshwater bodies have been called ‘the sources of life,’ and some of the most advanced civilizations of the world have originated and flourished on the banks of major rivers. Apart from being sources of sustenance, rivers have also been major hubs of economies. Their ease of transportation has facilitated mass mobility and trade and led to incalculable wealth accumulation. Clearly, this has been the case with America’s second longest river with the second largest drainage basin, the prodigious Mississippi River. The Noble Mississippi “The Mississippi River carries the mud of thirty states and two provinces 2,000 miles south to the delta and deposits 500 million tons of it there every year. The business of the Mississippi, which it will accomplish in time, is to methodically transport all of Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico.” – Charles Kuralt               From the time of Native Americans to the present, the “business” of the river has