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General Ann E. Dunwoody Four Star Role Model

How does a little girl grow up to be a four-star general?  In fact, the very first female four-star general in American history? So often we think there is a ‘proven formula,’ one that typically includes growing up in the proper environment, having a dream and vision, and then following a well-planned strategy. Well, interesting enough, even though General Ann Dunwoody grew up in a military family with four generations of West Pointers (brother, father, grandfather and great-grandfather), she had no intention of ever joining the Army. As far back as Dunwoody can remember, all she wanted was to major in physical education and coach.  The Proven Formula Gone Awry Ann E. Dunwoody was born an ‘army brat’ in Northern Virginia in the triumphant glow of post-World War II America. Her father, a career army officer, soon moved the family to Germany and Belgium where they participated in the post-war reconstruction of the largely decimated European continent. That’s when the ‘proven formula’ went a little awry. In her formative years, Dunwoody wanted nothing to do with the military, instead moving

Peter W. Singer: Definitive, Essential, Required Reading

A History of Conflict  From the beginning of time, man has been in violent and oft-times protracted conflict with man. Whether the dispute is rooted in religion, ideology, tribalism, nationalism, or something else, man has tended to engage in warring. Usually, one party is claiming ownership of the earth’s scarce resources, with or without legitimacy. It’s the never-ending story of the ‘haves’ versus the ‘have-nots.’ Some are seeking to accumulate even more power and wealth, others are seeking their freedom from oppression, and others, due to corrupt and incompetent leadership, are simply starving to death. At its origin, combat was hand-to-hand, then sword-to-sword, in open fields with the only apparent strategy being a man’s cunning and bravery, or foolhardiness. As the centuries marched forward, so too did the technologies, tools and strategies of war, and the battlefields on which the conflicts played out shifted as well. In the 18th and 19th centuries, gunpowder was adapted to make pistols, rifles and cannons the deadly weapons we’re familiar with today. New modes of transportation, including horseback and maritime, allowed the richest nations to dominate