fbpx

MORE GREAT ARTICLES

Articles

MYKA MEIER ETIQUETTE: ILLNESS/DEATH

What do you say to someone who has just lost a loved one, and how do you support them? I advise not to say you know how someone feels, because even if you have lost someone in the past, you still may not know how they feel. Instead, be sure to reach out and tell them you are thinking of them (or praying if you / they are religious) during this time and that if they need you for any reason, you are just a phone call away. I think it’s important to let someone know you are there to help or support. I also think it’s a nice gesture to cook or send food to the home of the person who just lost someone. Not only for them to have something to nurture the family at loss, but also to help feed any visitors who may stop by. What do you say to a friend who has a serious illness? How can you help but not get in the way? I think in this case it’s again important to

Fantasy Camps: Live Your Dream

Wish no more! Here’s your chance to live your fantasy! For boomers, it’s the perfect time to turn dreams into reality. As more of us approach retirement, fantasy camps are just the ticket to finally live our passion. These camps for grown-ups are popping up all over the U.S. ranging in price from a couple hundred to six figures. Camp sessions generally last a few days to a week, but some offer longer stays, even months. Living your fantasy ought to be in your bucket list. We’re not talking about fantasy football or other digital interaction. We’re talking about real life experiences, what you’ve “always wanted to do when you grew up” kind of things. Just to experience it once in your lifetime could be the most fulfilling thing you do for yourself. Have you ever fantasized what it would be like to be a rock star, a Broadway actor, a real-life 007, an astronaut, or race car driver?  We’re sharing some great ideas to reignite that “could have, should have” feeling once more, because now you really can live

David Solie: Sixty Is The New Sixty

One of the new mantras of aging in the twenty-first century is the refrain “sixty is the new forty.” Maybe. Good health and an impressive array of lifestyle options certainly make many of today’s sixty year olds look different compared to their parent’s generation. But appearances can be misleading. In their rush to celebrate biological vibrancy, sixty year olds could miss a crucial piece of information about what occurs developmentally on the journey to seventy. Biology is not psychology, and failure to appreciate the difference could leave elders uninformed and ill prepared for their final mission. Sixty year olds represent an “in between generation,” meaning not quite middle age and not quite old. Developmentally, “in between” is an appropriate characterization of a transition period marked by “agenda crossover.” What do I mean? Middle age and old age have markedly different developmental agendas. The transition between these age groups is not sudden. It is a crossover process where one agenda ramps off while the other ramps on. From a psychological perspective, knowing where you are coming from is interesting; knowing where

Taylor Hagood: The Love Of Halloween And The Fun It Brings To Us

Shadows Their silent mystery suggests a way of being that is different from yet thoroughly tied to the way of being we know as humans. They carry a wonder that comes with childhood and youth, when the world’s shadows can frighten and thrill at once, which is the essence of horror and the strange hope and excitement it creates. It takes youthful imagination truly to apprehend and appreciate shadow puppets, hands forming shadow animals and faces, and shadows in a moonlit room that turn familiar things into unrecognizable shapes that might just harbor a secret or a threat. There is a moment in the 1963 film The Haunting when a few shadows cast by an ornately carved panel seem to form a motionless face. As light from an unknown source dims and brightens, the face sharpens and fades against the menacing sound of a rising and falling voice. How often as a child did I myself lay in bed transfixed and chilled by ordinary, inanimate things coming alive through the accidental formation of shadows? Or was it accidental? When I was

Myka Meier: Dinner Table Etiquette Essentials That You Should Know

You are having dinner at someone’s home, and you’ve been served something you’d rather not eat. What is the best way to handle the situation? First off, if you accept a dinner invitation at someone’s home and you have any dietary restrictions or allergies, it’s up to you to tell your host in plenty of time ahead of the meal that you have dietary restrictions. It is not recommended however to tell your host your likes or dislikes. That being said, if you arrive to someone’s home and are served something you do not like, it can be very hurtful to tell your host you don’t like something they prepared. I would recommend eating everything else that you can, and cut a piece or two of the food you don’t so it looks like you at least tried it.  If your host asks if you didn’t like their meal, I would simply say I had a large meal prior, however that everything they served was so lovely. If you’ve invited a guest to dinner at your house and they bring

Expeditions Unpacked: What the Great Explorers Took into the Unknown

By Ed Stafford, illustrated by Christine Barrie | Published September 17, 2019 In this unique and enthralling book, explorer and survivalist Ed Stafford curates 25 great expeditions through the lens of the kit these remarkable explorers took with them. In an environment where lack of preparation could mean certain death, the equipment carried, ridden and sailed into uncharted territories could mean the success or failure of an expedition. Was it simply a case of better provisions and preparation that helped Amundsen beat Scott to the South Pole? And how has the equipment taken to Everest changed since Hillary’s first ascent? Through carefully curated photographs and specially commissioned illustrations we can see at a glance the scale, style and complexity of the items taken into the unknown by the greatest explorers of all time, and the impact each item had on their journey. How it potentially saved a life, or was purely for comfort or entertainment, and how these objects of survival have evolved and adapted as science advances, and we plunge further into the extremes. Expeditions Unpacked offers an intimate view of

Sarah Jane Adams: Expanding The Concept Of Fashion Beyond The Expected

She is not Givenchy, Yves St. Laurent, or Chanel, but she is a bold fashion influencer and Instagram sensation. Welcome to the world of Sarah Jane Adams aka Saramai Jewels, where anti-aging is taboo and wrinkles are worn as proud stripes. Little did British-born Adams know posting a photo online would spark the beginning of a social media phenomena. Was it an image of a famous celebrity or soccer star? No, it was simply a photo of her sporting a red Adidas varsity jacket, a gift from her daughter. The Beginning of Something Big The photo was uploaded and tagged with Adidas and Advanced Style, a popular blog about older women with a sense of style. Surprised at how well it was received, she began posting photos and selfies on Instagram daily. Things took off like wildfire and four years later, she has an enviable following of over 182,000. How did she cultivate such as following? Turns out her non-conformist eclectic fashion sense appeals to a broad demographic of women, mainly aged 15 to 40. Her mashup of vintage, hippy,

Taylor Hagood: “Football” Season

September has arrived and I cannot help myself. I must write about the sports that both begin their seasons at this time of the year and that go by the same name: football. Both are part of my life, or, in a sense, lives, for mine seems to spread into so many different kinds of places and situations. To begin at the beginning . . . Archie and Ole Miss My earliest memory of anything football-related is a game played on a television in my grandparents’ house in Mississippi. It was either a bowl game or “The Egg Bowl,” which is the name for the annual clash between Ole Miss and Mississippi State (traditionally played on Thanksgiving) for a golden trophy shaped like an egg. It must have been one of those games because extended family was there—my Arkansas cousins. Those cousins were University of Arkansas Razorback fans, but they were pulling for Ole Miss that day. I can remember my father and Uncle Bert watching, and I suspect my grandfather was watching from his great golden velvet chair (which

Myka Meier: Tech Manners & Etiquette

Should mobile devices be allowed at the dinner table at home or at a restaurant? I advise people put their phones on silent or vibrate and put them away during a meal. Unless it’s a working lunch over business, it can be seen as rude to be taking calls or checking your phone while someone else is dining across from you. If you are expecting an important call that may come through during the meal, I advise telling the person you are dining with at the beginning of the meal that it may come during your time together, and if it does, that you will only be a minute. Then, if the call comes through, you would excuse yourself and take the call away from the table. Is it proper for someone to answer their cell phone and engage in conversation in front of other people? Etiquette is simply about showing respect to those around you. I think it can be dependent on the situation, but in a social setting I think it’s best to put phones away or on

Nicholas McCarthy: In Concert with History

He’s building a legacy of inspiration in challenging others to look at things in a completely different way. Try doing something with one hand. It can be anything in your daily routine. Painfully inept at it, aren’t you? Now sit down in front of a piano with one hand behind your back and play Beethoven’s Waldstein Sonata. Exactly. Now imagine being born with one hand, hearing this scrumptious piece played on a piano for the first time, and immediately deciding then and there to learn not only how to play it on the piano but do it in concert for thousands of adoring music aficionados. That’s a pretty unlikely goal, yes? That’s because you’re not Nicholas McCarthy, who did precisely that. The level of confidence that must have taken is gargantuan, but not surprising coming from him. The Epiphany At the tender age of twelve, McCarthy heard his best friend playing this beautiful piece of classical music on the piano and shortly thereafter declared to his parents a lofty future plan to become a concert pianist. They looked at their