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HEALTH

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Dr. Laurie Rae Green: The MAVEN Project And Telemedicine

Telehealth is bringing quality health care to millions of underserved Americans. Dr. Laurie Green knows that sometimes an apple a day, doesn’t keep the doctor away. That’s why she’s bringing specialized doctors to underserved community clinics through her telemedicine mission, The MAVEN (Medical Alumni Volunteer Expert Network) Project. Through this non-profit endeavor, Dr. Green pairs retired and semi-retired doctors with patients in communities that need them the most. By using the Internet as an equalizer, Dr. Green is revolutionizing health care, keeping retired medical professionals active in their fields, and helping to make the world a healthier place. Something Old, Something New Dr. Green started The MAVEN Project in 2014 to fill the void that retired doctors feel once they put up their stethoscopes. Knowledge shouldn’t go to waste, in her opinion. “Doctors are very social people. They train in large student groups through medical school and are constantly working with teams throughout their professional careers to share their knowledge. Then comes retirement and doctors experience something they usually haven’t experienced — professional and intellectual isolation,” she said. Most doctors

Stan Popovich: How To Overcome The Fear of The Future

Almost everybody worries about what will happen in the future. The prospect of not knowing if something good or bad will happen to you in the near future can produce a lot of fear and anxiety. As a result, here is a list of techniques and suggestions on how to manage this fear of dealing with the future. 1. Can’t Predict What May Happen: Remember that no one can predict the future with 100 percent certainty. Even if the thing that you are afraid of does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. Remember that we may be 99 percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that 1 percent to make a world of difference. 2. Take Things Slow: Learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes

Dr Joel Kahn: Heart Health & Tips to Living Long and Well

While today’s “to do” list might have completion of a corporate project, planning a family vacation, picking up the dry cleaning, and making an evening Pilates class, I suggest you add one more item: taking steps to live long and well. Indeed, the possibility of living longer than our parents without the chronic diseases, medications, and surgeries that many of them endured is within our grasp and the key is to keep your body as young as possible while medical advances are progressing year after year. There are 4 things you can do starting today to maximize your odds of living long and well. None of them take much time or expenses. 1) Know Your “Arterial Age” Over 400 years ago the leading English physician, Thomas Sydenham, wrote that “we are as old as our arteries” and he has proven to be on target all these centuries later. The #1 killer worldwide, atherosclerosis, is not typically tested for at annual physicals but it can be screened for in a highly accurate, safe, and available manner that reveals whether your arteries are

DR. ALEXANDRA TARVIN – CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

With almost 38 million people in America having some degree of hearing loss, it is more prevalent than cancer or diabetes. While some people are born with hearing impairment, most will acquire it from one or more risk factors. Some risk factors include: type 2 diabetes (2-3 times more likely to develop hearing loss), cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, occupational and recreational noise exposure, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and family history of hearing loss. Individuals that have more than one risk factor are at an even higher risk of developing hearing loss. Hearing Healthcare It is routine to have your teeth checked every six months and your eyes around once a year, why does the average person wait until something is wrong (and then some) to have their hearing checked? When an individual finally addresses their hearing issues, they have waited an average of seven to ten years from the first time they noticed difficulty —this is unacceptable. This statistic has not changed in decades; nor the fact that only 25-30% of people that need hearing help actually seek

10 Things to Know About Your Health

Born between 1946 and 1964, Americans numbering over 70 million today are living longer and stronger than their parents.  “Baby Boomers,” named for the rise in births following World War II and the prosperous years thereafter, have benefited from medical advances in preventative and clinical care. Here’s what they and their families should be aware of medically these days: 1. Check for the “stealth virus.” Hepatitis C still haunts the last generation to go without effective screening for virus risks in blood transfusions and surgical (and dental) procedures. Boomers are five times more likely than any other age group to carry Hepatitis C, a virus that damages the liver long-term and could cause cancer as it goes undetected. A simple blood test finds it and a daily prescription pill for 2-3 months can end this threat. 2. Get the new shingles vaccine. Boomers who came down with chicken pox in childhood (before most Americans were immunized against it) can harbor a virus that arises later in life to trigger shingles attacks, marked by red spots on skin and often lingering pain. A

Dr. Jaclyn Banker: The Dizzy Doctor

Ever feel like your head is in a dizzying whirl? It can be sudden and scary. “Oh my God, my room is spinning, what’s happening to me?” Perhaps you or someone you know experienced an episode of severe dizziness. Sensing a room that’s spinning can impair one’s ability to turn in bed, stand up from a lying or sitting position, bend forward, and even walk. Jaclyn Banker, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT ( Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists.), is a specialist in treating this condition. She helps resolve dizziness in her patients and instructs them on how they can manage it at home. Known as a “dizzy doctor,” she says, “Seeking a physical therapist trained to treat this problem can help you quickly alleviate dizziness and return to normal activities.” Physical therapists (PTs) are known in the healthcare world as experts in the field of movement dysfunction. They analyze different movement patterns of each individual and develop a plan to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. PTs can teach people