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HEALTH

Articles

Coronavirus Prevention May Be in Your Pocket

From travel checkpoints to at-home screening, smartphone-based digital health tools could play a role in limiting outbreaks, writes Binah.ai CEO David Maman David Maman is CEO and founder of Binah.ai, a company that developed a video-based vital signs monitoring application for smartphones using artificial intelligence technology. To date, more than 2,400 deaths and 78,000 cases worldwide have been confirmed as a result of the coronavirus. Officially named COVID-19, the mortality and incidence of the disease are still rising, and these numbers will be even greater by the time you read this article. In an age where data, technology and connectivity are more advanced than ever before, each and every one of us bears personal responsibility for preventing the reach of a known epidemic. We live in a time where technology is at our fingertips and can be leveraged to potentially prevent public health emergencies, enabling all of us to share in and lighten the burden. While we are still learning about COVID-19, the initial panic has forced thousands of people to flock to hospitals and primary care centers to be

Coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19: Is it Over-hyped?

As of this minute according to a dashboard produced by Johns Hopkins with data sourced from the US CDC and the WHO, there have been 82,550 confirmed cases of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus that is now called SARS-CoV-2. That sounds pretty scary when the talking heads in the news media breathlessly toss out figures. And also as of this minute, 2,810 people, mostly elderly, immuno-compromised patients, have lost their lives as a result of this disease. What the media are loathe to tell us, however, are the number of people in whom the disease has run its course and who are now recovered. That number currently stands at 33,252. The news media are in the business of selling advertising. More viewers enable them to sell more ads at a higher price. And nothing sells air time like the latest tragedy, whether it exists or not. Humans have a natural fear of the unknown and COVID-19 was unknown when it burst onto the scene in December 2019. No one understood how virulent it was, or how

10 Things to Know About Your Health

Born between 1946 and 1964, Americans numbering over 70 million today are living longer and stronger than their parents.  “Baby Boomers,” named for the rise in births following World War II and the prosperous years thereafter, have benefited from medical advances in preventative and clinical care. Here’s what they and their families should be aware of medically these days: 1. Check for the “stealth virus.” Hepatitis C still haunts the last generation to go without effective screening for virus risks in blood transfusions and surgical (and dental) procedures. Boomers are five times more likely than any other age group to carry Hepatitis C, a virus that damages the liver long-term and could cause cancer as it goes undetected. A simple blood test finds it and a daily prescription pill for 2-3 months can end this threat. 2. Get the new shingles vaccine. Boomers who came down with chicken pox in childhood (before most Americans were immunized against it) can harbor a virus that arises later in life to trigger shingles attacks, marked by red spots on skin and often lingering pain. A

Dr. Laurie Rae Green: The MAVEN Project And Telemedicine

Telehealth is bringing quality health care to millions of underserved Americans. Dr. Laurie Green knows that sometimes an apple a day, doesn’t keep the doctor away. That’s why she’s bringing specialized doctors to underserved community clinics through her telemedicine mission, The MAVEN (Medical Alumni Volunteer Expert Network) Project. Through this non-profit endeavor, Dr. Green pairs retired and semi-retired doctors with patients in communities that need them the most. By using the Internet as an equalizer, Dr. Green is revolutionizing health care, keeping retired medical professionals active in their fields, and helping to make the world a healthier place. Something Old, Something New Dr. Green started The MAVEN Project in 2014 to fill the void that retired doctors feel once they put up their stethoscopes. Knowledge shouldn’t go to waste, in her opinion. “Doctors are very social people. They train in large student groups through medical school and are constantly working with teams throughout their professional careers to share their knowledge. Then comes retirement and doctors experience something they usually haven’t experienced — professional and intellectual isolation,” she said. Most doctors

DR. ALEXANDRA TARVIN – CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

With almost 38 million people in America having some degree of hearing loss, it is more prevalent than cancer or diabetes. While some people are born with hearing impairment, most will acquire it from one or more risk factors. Some risk factors include: type 2 diabetes (2-3 times more likely to develop hearing loss), cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, occupational and recreational noise exposure, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and family history of hearing loss. Individuals that have more than one risk factor are at an even higher risk of developing hearing loss. Hearing Healthcare It is routine to have your teeth checked every six months and your eyes around once a year, why does the average person wait until something is wrong (and then some) to have their hearing checked? When an individual finally addresses their hearing issues, they have waited an average of seven to ten years from the first time they noticed difficulty —this is unacceptable. This statistic has not changed in decades; nor the fact that only 25-30% of people that need hearing help actually seek

Dr. Jaclyn Banker: The Dizzy Doctor

Ever feel like your head is in a dizzying whirl? It can be sudden and scary. “Oh my God, my room is spinning, what’s happening to me?” Perhaps you or someone you know experienced an episode of severe dizziness. Sensing a room that’s spinning can impair one’s ability to turn in bed, stand up from a lying or sitting position, bend forward, and even walk. Jaclyn Banker, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT ( Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists.), is a specialist in treating this condition. She helps resolve dizziness in her patients and instructs them on how they can manage it at home. Known as a “dizzy doctor,” she says, “Seeking a physical therapist trained to treat this problem can help you quickly alleviate dizziness and return to normal activities.” Physical therapists (PTs) are known in the healthcare world as experts in the field of movement dysfunction. They analyze different movement patterns of each individual and develop a plan to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. PTs can teach people