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WELLNESS

Articles

Dr. Laurie Rae Green: The MAVEN Project And Telemedicine

Telehealth is bringing quality health care to millions of underserved Americans. Dr. Laurie Green knows that sometimes an apple a day, doesn’t keep the doctor away. That’s why she’s bringing specialized doctors to underserved community clinics through her telemedicine mission, The MAVEN (Medical Alumni Volunteer Expert Network) Project. Through this non-profit endeavor, Dr. Green pairs retired and semi-retired doctors with patients in communities that need them the most. By using the Internet as an equalizer, Dr. Green is revolutionizing health care, keeping retired medical professionals active in their fields, and helping to make the world a healthier place. Something Old, Something New Dr. Green started The MAVEN Project in 2014 to fill the void that retired doctors feel once they put up their stethoscopes. Knowledge shouldn’t go to waste, in her opinion. “Doctors are very social people. They train in large student groups through medical school and are constantly working with teams throughout their professional careers to share their knowledge. Then comes retirement and doctors experience something they usually haven’t experienced — professional and intellectual isolation,” she said. Most doctors

Stan Popovich: How To Overcome The Fear of The Future

Almost everybody worries about what will happen in the future. The prospect of not knowing if something good or bad will happen to you in the near future can produce a lot of fear and anxiety. As a result, here is a list of techniques and suggestions on how to manage this fear of dealing with the future. 1. Can’t Predict What May Happen: Remember that no one can predict the future with 100 percent certainty. Even if the thing that you are afraid of does happen there are circumstances and factors that you can’t predict which can be used to your advantage. Remember that we may be 99 percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that 1 percent to make a world of difference. 2. Take Things Slow: Learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes

10 Things to Know About Your Health

Born between 1946 and 1964, Americans numbering over 70 million today are living longer and stronger than their parents.  “Baby Boomers,” named for the rise in births following World War II and the prosperous years thereafter, have benefited from medical advances in preventative and clinical care. Here’s what they and their families should be aware of medically these days: 1. Check for the “stealth virus.” Hepatitis C still haunts the last generation to go without effective screening for virus risks in blood transfusions and surgical (and dental) procedures. Boomers are five times more likely than any other age group to carry Hepatitis C, a virus that damages the liver long-term and could cause cancer as it goes undetected. A simple blood test finds it and a daily prescription pill for 2-3 months can end this threat. 2. Get the new shingles vaccine. Boomers who came down with chicken pox in childhood (before most Americans were immunized against it) can harbor a virus that arises later in life to trigger shingles attacks, marked by red spots on skin and often lingering pain. A

Unlocking the Communication Code of Aging Parents

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”                                                                 -George Bernard Shaw If boomers think they had issues in the past communicating with their parents, try adding in their new role as caregiver.  They have quickly discovered how unprepared they actually are for the volatile conversation about provocative topics that dominate the last phase of life.  Not surprising, they are coming for these experiences frustrated, confused and deeply upset about “what went wrong” despite their best intentions. While it would be convenient to blame this all too common disconnect between generations on the eccentricities of their aging parents, the real problem can be traced back to the messages boomers are sending them.   For the most part, they are based on outdated assumptions about the psychology of older adults.  No matter how hard they try, they cant’ avoid delivering the wrong message.  What can make this better? The good news is that by updating their understanding of the  psychological agenda of their aging parents, boomers can use these new insights to dramatically improve the receptivity and effectiveness

Conor Heffernan: Tried and Tested Weight Loss Methods

The fitness industry is a notorious fickle thing. From Instagram influencers to nationally syndicated doctors, we, as consumers, are treated to a vast array of conflicting information about what to do with our bodies. Some weeks, its low carb, others its all vegetables. This week I was told by two friends, one a dietician and the other a trained doctor that eggs were problematic. Earlier in the year they told me to eat them with impunity. Thankfully I have an ace in the hole, an antidote to the madness which is our modern information ecosystem. Studying the history of health and fitness trends over the past several years has taught me two valuable lessons. First that my fiancé has indulged my vocation for far too long and second that what works tends to stick around. So with that in mind, today’s short article looks at tried and tested means of losing weight. These ‘old school’ methods were promoted by the bodybuilders of the early twentieth century. These men and women exercised at a time when steroids had not yet infiltrated

When Your Friends Do Not Understand Your Mental Health Issues

You struggle with fear, anxiety, depression, or addiction. Eventually your relatives and closest friends find out about your problems. The problem is that some of them get on your case and do not understand what you are going through. Here are six ways on how to deal with your friends regarding your mental health issues. 1.  Listen to the professionals and not your friends. Your friends may mean well, but when it comes down to it, the professionals know your situation more than anyone. They know what you are going through and are trained to deal with your situation. Your friends do not have the answers to your medical condition. When you have questions about your mental health recovery, consult with your counselor or other mental health  professional. Listen to them and follow their advice and not your friends. 2.  Your goal is to get better. Concentrate on how you can overcome your fears and anxieties. Don’t waste your time arguing with your friends or relatives who are giving you a difficult time. This isn’t a public relations event where you need to get approval from your friends. This is

Dr Joel Kahn: Heart Health & Tips to Living Long and Well

While today’s “to do” list might have completion of a corporate project, planning a family vacation, picking up the dry cleaning, and making an evening Pilates class, I suggest you add one more item: taking steps to live long and well. Indeed, the possibility of living longer than our parents without the chronic diseases, medications, and surgeries that many of them endured is within our grasp and the key is to keep your body as young as possible while medical advances are progressing year after year. There are 4 things you can do starting today to maximize your odds of living long and well. None of them take much time or expenses. 1) Know Your “Arterial Age” Over 400 years ago the leading English physician, Thomas Sydenham, wrote that “we are as old as our arteries” and he has proven to be on target all these centuries later. The #1 killer worldwide, atherosclerosis, is not typically tested for at annual physicals but it can be screened for in a highly accurate, safe, and available manner that reveals whether your arteries are

Dr. Maria T. Llopiz: Coming to America

Fleeing a communist regime, she climbed up the ranks of medicine to achieve the American dream. I arrived for my appointment and a medical assistant opened the door at the doctor’s clinic. Entering the office, she signaled me to wait. In just a few seconds, the doctor walks in still speaking to a patient outside. “Don’t worry Mirta, it’s exactly what we hoped for,” she said. Curiously, she was holding a bag of bananas. Naturally, I was curious and asked why. “Some patients can’t pay with money, so they do the best they can,” she answered. I think that moment itself encapsulates everything about her. She sat down and proceeded to let me in on her story of persistence, faith, and the American dream. Maria Teresa Llopiz, PhD ENT, is an otorhinolaryngologist, specializing in the diagnosis, treatment, and surgery of disorders of the nose, throat, ear, and related structures of the head and neck. Faced with New Challenges Due to political persecution, Dr. Llopiz fled her homeland of Cuba in 1992. Along with her two children, 4- and 10-years old,

Tips to Overcome the Fear of Loneliness

Sometime or another we will experience a time when we are alone. Some people fear of being alone for various reasons. The first step is to become comfortable with yourself and having the self-confidence that you will be able to manage being alone. There is nothing wrong with being alone. If being alone bothers you then seeing a counselor can help you with these issues. In the meantime here are seven tips on overcoming the fear of being alone. Find An Activity Find an activity that you enjoy and where you can meet a lot of people. Doing something that you like to do will make you happy and will increase your chances of making friends. Spend Time With Animals Spending time with an animal or pet can help us to feel better. Animals can be of good company to all of us whether we are alone or not. There are many local shelters that could use your time and talents. Helping Others There are many people out there who could benefit from your time and skill sets. Helping others

Overcoming Depression & Fear

Some people have a difficult time in managing their depression. Sometimes, their depression and fears can become a huge factor in their personal life and professional career. Here are six tips that a person can use to help manage their depression. Challenge Your Depressing Thoughts: One of the ways to manage your depression is to challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking. When encountering thoughts that make you fearful or depressed, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. Your fearful thoughts are usually not based on reality. Distract Yourself: Some people can get depressed over doing a certain task. When this happens, a person should take a deep breath and try to find something to do to get their mind off of the problem. A person could take a walk, listen to some music, read the newspaper or do an activity that will give them a fresh perspective on things. Doing something will get your mind off of the problem and give you confidence to do other things. Worrying Makes